Robert Thorne Waite RWS watercolour (SOLD)

Watercolour on paper 29,5 x 49,5   (SOLD) Haymaking At Oxwich Bay South Wales signed 'R. Thorne Waite' (lower left) Robert Thorne Waite RWS (1842-1935) Royal Society of Painters in Water-Colours Landscape painter who usually painted in watercolour and only rarely in oil. Born in Cheltenham and studied at South Kensington. Exhibited at the Royal Academy from 1870. Elected ARWS in 1876. Painted pastoral scenes in Yorkshire and Southern England, especially the Sussex Downs. When he became a member of the Royal Society of Painters in Water-Colours in 1884, Thorne-Waite presented Landscape with Goats as his diploma piece. With it he declared his allegiance to DeWint and to the brand of landscape painting in watercolors practiced by his friend Thomas Collier and others in the Royal Society of Painters in Water-Colours. Between 1861 and 1865, Thomas-Waite studied architectural draftsmanship at the South Kensington School. An inclination toward landscape watercolors was already in evidence, encouraged, no doubt, by a season pent with Collier at Betws-y-Coed. Thorn-Waite was not, however, fully of the Collier camp of Cox - and - DeWint - inspired Landscape. At the time of his election as an associate of the Old Water-Colours Society in 1876. Thorne Waite was modeling his watercolors so closely on those of Birket Foster that the older artist complained that the new associate was copying him. Even after his technique broadened and drew closer to Collier’s, Thorn Waite still retained a sweetness - what one critic dismissed as «  an incurable trick of prettiness «  - in his rustic imagery which recalled Birket Fosterl. SW 1. Ian C. Cooke. «  The Golden Days of Robert Thorne Waiite , 1842-1935 » 2. Spectator, December 9, 1882. p. 1578 Robert Thorne Waite RWS (1842-1935) Landscape painter who usually painted in watercolour and only rarely in oil. Born in Cheltenham and studied at South Kensington. Exhibited at the Royal Academy from 1870. Elected ARWS in 1876. Painted pastoral scenes in Yorkshire and Southern England, especially the Sussex Downs.   [gallery type="rectangular" ids="3284,3283,3288,3287,3285,3286"] BRITISH WATER-COLOUR ART IN THE FIRST YEAR OF THE REIGN OF KING EDWARD THE SEVENTH, AND DURING THE CENTURY COVERED BY THE LIFE OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY OF PAINTERS IN WATER COLOURS. ILLUSTRATED BY THE COLLECTION OF DRAWINGS DEDICATED BY THAT SOCIETY TO THEIR MAJESTIES THE KING AND QUEEN AT THEIR CORONATION BY MARCUS B. HUISH, LL.B. LATE EDITOR ' THE ART JOURNAL ; ' AUTHOR OF * JAPAN AND ITS ART ' ' GREEK TERRACOTTAS,' ETC. LONDON THE FINE ART SOCIETY ADAM AND CHARLES BLACK 1904 R. THORNE-WAITE, R.W.S. THE old maxim "Quot homines, tot sententiae," that has no doubt disappeared from the Latin grammars of to-day, is (perhaps fortunately) as true of picture-buyers as of the rest of mankind. Some purchase merely from the pleasure of acquisition, and to them oftener than not another relic of early Latinity is applicable, " Vires acquirit eundo," for buying becomes a disease in which acquisition is everything and possession of no account. Of the ordinary purchasers, as dis- tinguished from the collectors, some buy pictures as furniture, some as decorations, some because they have a desire to look upon good colouring, but some, and we hope the largest portion, buy for the real pleasure that the pictured scene affords, the contrast that it presents to the squalid surroundings of a great city, the peace that it confers upon a mind wearied with mundane worries. It is doubtless for this last-named reason that representations of landscape, especially of open spaces such as those limned by Mr. Thorne- Waite, have acquired such a hold upon the modern affections, bringing as they do to jaded minds recollec- tions of holidays passed in the sunshine far away from the stress of business. Mr. Thorne-Waite in his work is constant to a somewhat limited area, but one that fulfils all the con- ditions that the class we have named require. For, looking at the list of what he deems to be his principal drawings, it will be seen how they group round that small district in Sussex where the Downs hold up the Southern Weald from the sea. Their very titles, " The Down Farm," "New Mown Hay/' "Lewes Mill," " Calling Home the Cattle/' " The Last Load," " Corn Field, Steyning," without any knowledge of Mr. Thorne- Waiters work, bring with them the exhilarating scents of the uplands, and conjure up the health-laden airs of the English Channel tempered by their passage over the sun-warmed downs. To those who know his water colours they go further, for they present pictures of wide, richly coloured landscapes, covered with sky expanses in which clouds hurried by the western wind chase one another across the picture, or wherein the blue zenith is unflecked save by the faintest fine- weather cirri. " In the manner of David Cox " ? Maybe. But carried far further, and executed with the far greater delicacy befitting such scenes. It is difficult to believe that so thorough a land- scapist ever affected figure painting, but in early life that was the role he desired to excel in. Born at Cheltenham in 1842, he received his Art education at South Kensington, and obtained election to the Society as an Associate in 1876, and as a full member in 1884. His principal water colours he deems to be : " The Blue Waggon," " Calling Home the Cattle," Mill," " Passing Showers," The Day is Beginning," " The Last Load," " The Wilmington Giant," " The Northern Side of the Downs," " Cornfield, Bristol Valley," Findar Downs," "A Yorkshire Valley," " Richmond Castle, York."

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